interpersonal

Social Media vs. Traditional Networking – Which is better for you?

networking-phoneOver the last few years I’ve met people that swear by social media saying that they never have to go to another in-person networking event. I’ve also met my share of people who feel that social media is merely a distraction with no real value. How do I feel? Well, given that I offer courses in both traditional networking and social media I’m sure you can tell that I believe there’s value in both. And like most things in life, where you get the most benefit will depend on your situation. I will say that completely discounting either method of making new connections is a mistake. I have had successes using both methods and I know many others that have as well.

Why People Don’t Like You

despairNone of us like the feeling of being rejected but it’s even more difficult to swallow when something like friendship, which has a relatively low social risk, is rejected. With much of our social interactions moving on-line and the anonymity of the internet, this type of rejection is becoming especially common. But it being common doesn’t necessarily lower the impact it has on our self-esteem.

Two Quick Tips to Stop Mumbling

Photo by Andriyko Podilnyk on UnsplashYou have a lot to say and are enthusiastic about what you have to say, yet you’re lacking one key ingredient — no one can understand you because you mumble. You may mumble and not even be aware of it — although a good indicator is when people are always asking you to repeat yourself because they didn’t hear or understand what you said.

Will Web 2.0 Kill Public Speaking?

Will Web 2.0 Kill Public Speaking?Since the internet rush of the 1990’s which meant going online wasn’t just for nerds, the way we communicate has changed significantly. Email helped us record and organize conversations, text messages helped us zap quick notes to each other and social networks allowed us to reach people from all over the globe. Teleseminars, podcasts, blogs and webinars now give us the ability to potentially communicate to millions of people. So where does public speaking fit in to all of this? And more importantly, will there still be a need for public speaking as the internet continues to change the way we communicate?

Correcting Others Makes YOU Look Bad

Correcting Others Makes YOU Look BadHave you ever misspoken, only to have someone correct you right away? Are you thankful that the person cared enough to point out your error to everyone within earshot? Some people just can’t resist pointing out other people’s errors, regardless of who’s present and how minuscule the error is.

I once knew someone that would jump at the chance to correct everyone at every chance he could. From grammatical errors to pronunciation mistakes to misspellings in email messages, this guy couldn’t resist adding his two cents and showing everyone how smart he was and how dumb everyone else was. How did people like this person? They hated him.

Useful Feedback or Toilet Paper: You Decide – The Three Types of Useless Feedback

Whenever you give a speech, people will inevitably give you feedback regardless of whether you’ve asked for it or not. Sometimes the feedback will be something you can actually put to use to improve your presentation. But frequently, it’s not helpful and in some instances can be harmful – especially if it gets you thinking about it (for one reason or another) to the point where it becomes a distraction.

You Can’t Please Everyone

I once heard that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again while expecting a different result. Well I’d like to add a second definition: trying to please everyone. Trying to make everyone in a group happy ranges from difficult to impossible and the only guarantee you have is that you’ll wish you never tried.

This topic comes up frequently in both my public speaking and networking classes as people are concerned about what others think. I think we all have a natural tendency to focus on the audience members that aren’t paying attention to us during a speech or the folks at a networking event that say “it was nice to meet you — I see a client on the other side of the room” immediately after you introduce yourself.